Our lens selection

Blue Lenses offer a protective shield that reduces glare and blue light from digital screens and artificial lights that lead to digital eye strain.Blue lenses reflect and filter blue light emitted by digital devices and artificial light.


Transitions (Photochromic lenses) are eyeglass lenses that are clear (or nearly clear) indoors and darken automatically when exposed to sunlight. Other terms sometimes used for photochromic lenses include "light-adaptive lenses" and "variable tint lenses"


Polarized Lenses: The sun’s rays reflect light in every direction, so when a ray hits a flat surface, the reflected light shines back at your eye and is magnified, causing glare. It reduces your depth perception, distorts your view and color perception, and can even temporarily blind you.Polarized lenses designed to absorb horizontal light waves, while still allowing vertical waves to pass through. Because light only travels in one direction through polarized lenses, glare is eliminated


High-index lenses: thinner  and  lighter. Because of their ability to bend light more efficiently, high-index lenses for nearsightedness have thinner edges and high-index lenses for farsightedness have a thinner center than lenses with the same prescription power that are made of conventional plastic or polycarbonate material


Progressive lenses: Instead of having just two or three lens powers like bifocals or trifocals, progressive lenses are true "multifocal" lenses that provide a seamless progression of many lens powers for all viewing distances. With progressive lenses, you can look up to see clearly across the room and in the distance


Bifocals are eyeglasses with two distinct optical powers. Bifocals are commonly prescribed to people with presbyopia who also require a correction for myopia, hyperopia, and/or astigmatism


Polycarbonate lenses are up to 10 times more impact-resistant than plastic or glass lenses and they provide 100% protection from the sun's harmful UV rays. They are also lightweight, adding to the comfort of your eyeglasses, sunglasses, and sports eyewear


CR-39, or allyl diglycol carbonate (ADC), is a plastic polymer commonly used in the manufacture of eyeglass lenses. The abbreviation stands for "Columbia Resin #39", which was the 39th formula of a thermosetting plastic developed by the Columbia Resins project in 1940




50% OFF COMPLETE PAIR OF SINGLE VISION LENSES AND ANY COATINGS.

(Select Frames and Restrictions May Apply)

50% OFF DESIGNER FRAMES.

(Select Frames and Restrictions May Apply)

Hours of Operation

Our Regular Schedule

Libertyville Office Hours

Monday:

10:00 am-7:00 pm

Tuesday:

10:00 am-7:00 pm

Wednesday:

10:00 am-7:00 pm

Thursday:

10:00 am-7:00 pm

Friday:

10:00 am-7:00 pm

Saturday:

9:00 am-4:00 pm

Sunday:

Closed

Waukegan Office Hours

Monday:

10:00 am-7:00 pm

Tuesday:

10:00 am-7:00 pm

Wednesday:

10:00 am-7:00 pm

Thursday:

10:00 am-7:00 pm

Friday:

10:00 am-7:00 pm

Saturday:

9:00 am-4:00 pm

Sunday:

Closed

Locations

Find us on the map

Testimonials

Reviews From Our Satisfied Patients

  • "Great place good service was very happy I would recommend for all my friends"
    Dean L. Waukegan, IL
  • "Great customer service. The staff know how to pick the right prescription and right frames. The technician is amazing. All of the staff are a pleasure to work with. The only place I go for my eyes!"
    Florianna Gerasimova
  • "Great place good service was very happy I would recommend for all my friends"
    Dean Lautenschlager

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